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Diabetes
Treatment and care

 

MEDICATION

 

 

There are multiple options for treating diabetes that can help control blood sugar levels. Each medicine accomplishes it in a different way. Next, you can see what those medications are and the effect they have on your body.

 


**Not all medicines might be available in your country. Talk to a health care professional**
Adapted from (Davies, y otros, 2018)6

 

It is possible that at some point during your illness the pancreas stops producing insulin. Your doctor can order self-administered insulin to control your blood sugar levels. If this recommendation comes from your doctor, you should know that:4

  • There are different types of insulin depending on how fast they work, when they peak, and how long their effect lasts.
  • Insulin is available in different strengths.
  • There are insulins that help you control your glucose before meals or throughout the day.

 

 

HOW IS INSULIN APPLIED?

 

 

Insulin when inactivated by digestive enzymes cannot be used in tablets or capsules, so the route of application of insulin is subcutaneous, that is, applying in a layer of fat under the skin with a syringe.7

There are body sites where it is advisable to apply insulin, within those sites are: the fat layer of the abdomen, hips, thighs, buttocks and the back of the arms.

 

If you become a candidate for insulin administration, you should know that there are three devices7 for which you can apply.

 

  • Syringe: disposable syringes where the number of units of insulin prescribed by your doctor is charged. These are still used, however, the popularity of pens and pumps for insulin is growing.
  • Pencil: they carry this name because they have a size and shape like a writing pen. This pen contains insulin. The dose is adjustable according to the doctor's indication.
  • Pump: electronic devices that pass insulin continuously. They are quite popular in those patients who should be administered several daily doses.

 

TECHNIQUE FOR THE APPLICATION OF INSULIN WITH SYRINGE

It is important to follow a good technique in the application of insulin, this helps the technique is perfected more and more for both patient safety and the effectiveness of insulin, follow the following tips.7

  • Wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Take the insulin vial and check the labels correctly to make sure you use the indicated one, this if you use more than one type of insulin.
  • Fill the syringe with an amount of air equal to the dose of insulin to be administered.
  • Inject the air from the syringe into the vial with the insulin.
  • Vacuum the number of units of insulin to be injected.
  • Clean with an alcohol swab the area where the insulin will be applied.
  • Pinch the area to be injected and apply the insulin injection at a 90? de angle

** Please follow your Health Care Professional indications. Contact him/her if you have any doubts. **

 

TECHNIQUE FOR THE APPLICATION OF INSULIN WITH A PEN

If you have a pen device for the application of insulin, follow the following tips.7

  • Wash your hands with soap and water.
  • Take the pen and verify that you have marked the number of units of insulin that should be administered.
  • Clean the area where the insulin will be applied with a cotton swab.
  • Pinch the area to be injected and apply the insulin injection at a 90 de angle.

** Please follow your Health Care Professional indications. Contact him/her if you have any doubts. **

 

 

References

4.  American Diabetes Association. (2019). American Diabetes Association. Retrieved from www.diabetes.org

6. Davies, M., D’Alessio, D., Fradkin, J., Kernan, W., Mathieu, C., Mingrone, G., . . . Buse, J. (2018). Management of hyperglycaemia in type 2 diabetes, 2018. A consensus report by the American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD). Diabetoligia, 2461-2498.

7. American Association of Diabetes Educators. (2019). AADE. Retrieved from https://www.diabeteseducator.org/docs/default-source/legacy-docs/_resources/pdf/general/Insulin_Injection_How_To_AADE.pdf